OSPIRG Latest Blog Posts

FTC announces new internet privacy rules for children –The Federal Trade Commission is looking at new privacy rules for children, whom they state as “very tech savvy but judgment poor”.

Rising Textbook Prices - With Oregon Universities back in class this month, it’s a great time to remind students about ways to avoid rising textbook prices.

Some decent news for health insurance consumers today. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) issued their much-awaited decision on Regence BlueCross BlueShield's proposal to raise rates over 22% on nearly 60,000 Oregonians.

Without the influence of large-scale speculative trading on oil in the commodities futures market, the average price of gasoline at the pump in April would have been $3.13 rather than $3.96.

Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon is proposing to raise rates an average of 22% on 60,000 Oregonians. This is the fifth straight year of double-digit rate hikes. But this year, something interesting is happening.

If you haven't seen the Oregonian's editorial on the Senate's health insurance exchange bill, it's worth a read. Unfortunately, the Oregon Senate decided to prohibit the exchange from negotiating with insurance companies to get consumers a better deal (which I'm sure insurers are happy about.)

What if health insurance companies had to stand before the public and clearly justify their rate hikes?

If you are a Health Net customer, you may have received a notice in the mail this week. If you did, we urge you to open it.

From the Frontier Group blog: "I hate to call attention to George Will’s latest column – a psycho-political portrait that seeks to explain why liberals supposedly adore high-speed rail. It’s an asinine column, for sure. But it is asinine in a particularly instructive way. For while Will seeks to shine a light on the workings of the progressive mind, he winds up shining a light into his own – and into the minds of the current crop of rail haters."

Another insightful blog post by US DOT Secretary Ray LaHood, this time following a visit to Indiana, where rail equipment manufacturing is on the upswing, along with an increase in good-paying American jobs.