OSPIRG's right to repair virtual town hall draws state lawmakers and over 100 attendees

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Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

Oregonians are ready to save money and reduce e-waste by advocating for our right to repair the stuff we own.

On Jan. 21, OSPIRG hosted a virtual town hall on Facebook Live, alongside right to repair champions state Rep. Janeen Sollman and state Sen. Jeff Golden, to discuss what Oregon lawmakers are doing to make right to repair a reality in our state. With more than 100 people in attendance, the event covered the myriad ways right to repair legislation is a must in a 21st-century economy — from reducing e-waste and cutting climate pollution, to saving consumers money and closing the digital divide.

"What if instead of junking that phone that stopped working recently and buying a new one, there was a convenient and affordable way to fix it and extend its life?" said OSPIRG State Director Charlie Fisher. "We imagine a new kind of system, where instead of throwing things out, we reuse, salvage and rebuild."

Read more about OSPIRG's campaign for our right to repair.

Tell your state lawmakers to support right to repair

A bill we've worked to get introduced in the legislature would ensure Oregonians' right to repair their stuff — which in turn would reduce e-waste and save consumers money.

Photo: Proprietary repair restrictions on all kinds of devices prevent consumers from fixing their electronics themselves or bringing them to the repair shop of their choice — but new state legislation to ensure Oregonians' right to repair could change that. Credit: ProstockStudio via Shutterstock

Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.